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Our IV catheters leverage proprietary technologies and advanced features to help you optimize patient care and improve clinical outcomes. We specifically developed them based on clinicians' and their patients' needs, as understanding these needs is a key priority at BD. Capability Please Select Anesthesia delivery Biosciences Cervical cancer screening Diabetes care Drug delivery systems Hazardous drug safety Infection prevention Infusion therapy Interventional specialities Lab automation Medication and supply management Microbiology solutions Molecular diagnostics Sharps disposal solutions Single cell multiomics Software solutions Specimen collection Surgical instruments Syringes and needles.

Product Line Please Select. Capability Select Capability Capability Anesthesia delivery Biopsy Biosciences Biosurgery Cervical cancer screening Diabetes care Drainage Drug delivery systems Gastrointestinal care Hazardous drug safety Hernia repair and fixation Home care Infection prevention Infusion therapy Interventional specialities Lab automation Medication and supply management Medication management Microbiology solutions Molecular diagnostics Molecular systems Patient monitoring and temperature management Prostate health Respiratory care Sharps disposal solutions Single cell multiomics Software solutions Specimen collection Supply management Surgical instruments Syringes and needles Urology and kidney health Vascular access Vascular surgery Wound care.

IV catheters Choose the right IV catheters for you and your patients Our IV catheters leverage proprietary technologies and advanced features to help you optimize patient care and improve clinical outcomes. Do you like this? Share it:. Offerings Capabilities Brands Integrated solutions Catalogs. Contact Sales Contact Support. Contact Support Capability Select Capability Capability Anesthesia delivery Biopsy Biosciences Biosurgery Cervical cancer screening Diabetes care Drainage Drug delivery systems Gastrointestinal care Hazardous drug safety Hernia repair and fixation Home care Infection prevention Infusion therapy Interventional specialities Lab automation Medication and supply management Medication management Microbiology solutions Molecular diagnostics Molecular systems Patient monitoring and temperature management Prostate health Respiratory care Sharps disposal solutions Single cell multiomics Software solutions Specimen collection Supply management Surgical instruments Syringes and needles Urology and kidney health Vascular access Vascular surgery Wound care.

Please select a Capability in order to start your service request.Intravenous IV fluids are a common way to administer fluids to cats at the veterinary hospital. They are commonly used for any cause of dehydration and for conditions such as kidney disease, urinary obstruction, vomiting and diarrhea. We will tell you what IV fluids are and how they are administered. Fluids are critical to cats. A loss of just 10 percent of body fluid can cause your cat severe illness.

It is most important, therefore, that you replace the lost fluids and correct dehydration. Fluids can be given in a number of ways. In a hospital setting, giving fluids through an intravenous catheter is the most common method. There are other methods to administer fluids especially in emergency situations, fluids are sometimes administered into the abdominal cavity but this is relatively uncommon.

Your cat can also receive fluids subcutaneously, in the area just under the skin and on top of the underlying muscle. For more information on this — go to Subcutaneous Fluid Administration in Cats. Some pet owners learn to do this routinely at home if needed and recommended by your veterinarian.

Your cat will stay at the veterinary clinic when receiving IV fluids. Intravenous fluids gives cats immediate treatment for dehydration and the amount can be easily changed. Injectable fluids come in various forms. Lactated ringers, 0.

Why Should My Pet Receive IV Fluids During Surgery?

Fluids containing dextrose or sugar solutions are also given, depending on the underlying condition being treated. Supplements such as potassium or vitamin B is common added to the fluids. Drugs may also be added such as metoclopramide to help control vomiting. The most common leg and vein used to administer intravenous fluids is the cephalic vein which is on top of the front leg below the elbow. Other veins can be used such as a vein in the rear leg called the saphenous vein.

It is generally only used when the front leg cannot be used for some reason. Other veins such as the jugular vein in the neck can also be used — most often for critical patients or patients that are extremely dehydrated.

To administer IV fluids, the veterinarian or veterinary staff generally clips the hair over the vein to be used and disinfects the skin.

A sterile intravenous catheter is inserted. The catheter itself is a flexible soft plastic that stays in the vein. The fluids line is then connected to the catheter through which fluids are administered.Charges for international or remote locations for example, Scottish Highlands and Islands will always be incurred and the final amount will be determined upon receipt of order. Orders will be delivered by our nominated carrier to the address given on the order.

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Goods need to be returned in adequate packaging to avoid damage in transit. You can telephone our customer services team on to place an order, Monday to Friday from 9. Alternatively, you can fax us onor email us on sales thevetstore. Incredible prices across our range, from bandages and casting to dressings and swabs. Top quality at low prices! We cater for all veterinary requirements and our wide range of great priced products proves this!

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Create a new list.Fluid therapy involves the intravenous or subcutaneous administration of fluid to an animal. This is typically done to replace fluid that has been lost either due to injury or disease. Vets use fluid therapy often, as it is a key part of treating some of the most common medical problems that owners will bring their pets to a clinic for.

Fluids are commonly administered to cat intravenously through a veinor subcutaneously under the skin. To begin intravenous IV fluid therapy, the vet will give the cat a mild sedative and shave the area around the vein being targeted for injection.

This will both allow the vet to easily locate the vein and make it more straightforward to attach the IV drip to the cat. The next step is to insert a catheter using a hypodermic needle and tape it in place before attaching the drip. The drip is then connected to a bag of fluid normally a saline solutionwhich is elevated above the cat so that it can drain via gravity at a steady pace into the cat's body.

When the bag is sufficiently depleted, the catheter is removed and the injection site is swabbed. The procedure is performed in-office by vets, but is also commonly recommended for at-home administration for cats with chronic health issues, such as kidney disease. After having undergone intravenous fluid therapy, the cat should show improvement within a couple of hours. That said, if there is a serious underlying condition it will take time for the cat to fully regain its health, as fluid therapy in this context should be thought of as a management strategy and not a form of treatment.

Intravenous fluid replacement therapy is much faster and more efficient than oral replenishment i. Following the procedure, there will be a period during which the cat is much more alert and energetic than before the fluid therapy.

It is important for owners to remember that this is still a recovery stage and they should limit the activity of the cat as much as possible, lest their symptoms return. In the case of injury especially, extra care should be taken to make sure the cat does not re-open their wounds either by biting which is fixable with an e-collar or by vigorous activity which can be mitigated by keeping them indoors.

The vet will also most likely want to schedule further visits in order to check the progress of recovery and refill any prescriptions for medication or painkillers. The vet might also wish for the cat to undergo fluid replacement at home, in which case they will provide the owner with instructions and equipment to carry out the procedure themselves.

However, fluid therapy is often administered as just one component of a larger treatment plan. Although most fluid therapy procedures go off without a hitch, cat owners should be aware that there are some potential downsides. Pain and general discomfort is the first problem. Although most cats will be given a sedative, much like humans who have injections or give blood there will be residual pain and numbness after the procedure.They are most commonly used to administer drugs and fluid therapy; however they can also be used to provide nutritional support directly into the venous system.

IV catheters can also help facilitate blood collection in animals with poor veins, or who need multiple samples to be taken. As the catheter is introduced directly into the venous system, it must be placed in an aseptic manner to help prevent sepsis and other complications. Strict aseptic technique must be followed for every catheter, even if they are only indwelling for a short time. Select an appropriate vein. Peripheral indwelling IV catheters are most commonly placed in the cephalic vein in dogs and cats.

In the hind limb, they are most commonly placed in the lateral saphenous vein. Other veins used often for catheterisation include the accessory cephalic, and medial saphenous. Think about your patient, their reason for hospitalisation, and their status. If they are vomiting, it will be easier to keep a saphenous catheter clean and dry, conversely, if they have diarrhoea, then you want a cephalic.

It will make your life easier. Realistically, you want the largest catheter you can comfortably place in your patient, that will do the job necessary. No bigger, no smaller. If your catheter is too large, it can occlude the vein or even cause trauma. Most dogs will easily take a 20g, larger dogs, and 18g.

Cats are fine with a 22g. If you are infusing fluids are a high rate, you want a larger bore catheter, rather than a smaller one.

iv catheter cat

Your fluid pump will be quieter! Length also plays a part. Catheters come in different lengths. Generally speaking, longer catheters are more stable. I cannot stress how important proper skin preparation is.

The catheter is a portal from the dirty outside world, straight into the bloodstream! Hair should be clipped large enough that the entire catheter hub, connections and of course insertion site, are hair free.

Catheter

This may be longer than you were expecting. All intravenous catheters should be placed using the same skin preparation techniques we use for surgery. Contact time is just as important here as it is for surgical skin prep. It is extremely important to ensure you wash your hands before placing the catheter, and always use good aseptic technique when handling the equipment and placing the catheter. You should also wear exam gloves as you are in contact with blood, at least until the catheter is placed and the hub is capped off.

iv catheter cat

You can remove your gloves to place the tape, if there is not excess blood around.In this VETgirl online veterinary continuing education videowe demonstrate how to place an intravenous IV catheter.

This is a common daily procedure that veterinarians and veterinary technicians must feel comfortable performing. To start, make sure to be well prepared and have all the supplies necessary in place e. The cephalic vein is often the most common and easiest location to use for catheterization.

To start, have the restrainer gently holding the patient behind the elbow to secure the limb. Make sure to avoid creating clipper burn or skin irritation. You can consider using a topical ELMA e. Gently scrub the catheter site, similar to surgical scrub preparation, starting from the center of the site and moving out to the periphery while scrubbing. Once this has been done, use non-sterile gloves for catheter placement.

Carefully open an appropriately-sized catheter while maintaining sterility.

Placing IV Catheters – Hints, Tips and Avoiding Common Mistakes for Vet Nurses

Inspect the catheter to make sure that there are no defects, abnormalities, or burrs on the catheter. Palpate the vein above your sterile insertion site to visualize where you want to place the catheter, making sure to keep the site sterile and clean. While holding onto the hub of the catheter, insert the IV catheter directly into the vein at an approximately degree angle; the bevel of the catheter should ideally be facing upwards. The non-dominant hand should be used to restrain the distal limb simultaneously.

Ideally, the vein should be catheterized as distal as possible within the sterile field to allow for multiple attempts of catheterization if needed. Once blood starts to fill the hub, the catheter should be slowly inserted parallel to the vein in small millimeter increments to seed the catheter directly into the vein.

Once the catheter is thought to be seeded within the vein, the catheter should be inserted over the stylet typically with the forefingerwithout moving the location of the stylet. Once the catheter is in place, it should be secured in place with white tape e. A small piece of Tegaderm can be used to place over the insertion site — this will protect the site and allow for daily visualization as needed. Make sure not to tape the catheter in too tight, or toe swelling can occur.

The flushed t-port can now be secured onto the catheter with an injection port as needed.Courtney has several publications to her credit. She enjoys spending her free time with her husband and two daughters.

Urethral obstruction is a potentially life-threatening emergency. Male cats are more prone to obstruction than female cats. The urethra—the tubular passage through which urine is discharged from the bladder to outside the body—can become obstructed for several reasons. The urethra is longer and narrower in male cats than in female cats; therefore, male cats are more likely to develop an obstruction.

The most common cause of obstruction is a urethral plug, which consists of mineral crystals e. Cats with a history of lower urinary tract disease—particularly interstitial cystitis—are at an increased risk for developing urethral obstruction.

Initially, the most common clinical sign is stranguria, which is sometimes mistaken by the owner as constipation. Affected cats can be observed frequently licking their genital region. On abdominal palpation, the urinary bladder is often large and firm and cannot be expressed easily. Caution should be used when attempting to express a possibly obstructed bladder. If too much pressure is applied to the distended bladder, it can rupture.

If bladder rupture is suspected, the goal is to immediately stabilize the patient so that the clinician can perform emergency surgery. If the urethral obstruction goes untreated for more than 24 to 48 hours, the resulting uremia can lead to hypothermia, bradycardia, tachypnea, altered levels of consciousness including comaand death.

A common finding associated with urethral obstruction is a large, firm bladder on abdominal palpation.

iv catheter cat

Urine should be collected for urinalysis, culture, and sensitivity testing. Serum potassium levels can be used to assess cardiotoxicity associated with hyperkalemia. Abdominal radiographs can help determine the presence of cystic or urethral calculi. Identification of calculi stones affects how an obstruction is treated. The presence of calculi can make it much more difficult to use a urinary catheter to remove the obstruction and can result in additional urethral trauma. If bladder stones are present, a cystotomy should be performed after the urethral obstruction has been removed and the patient is stable enough to undergo anesthesia.

Voiding urohydropulsion is another method that can be used to remove bladder stones. Administering IV fluids is the initial step in therapeutic management. Traditionally, 0.

IV Catheter Placement

Aggressive fluid therapy is indicated in patients that are markedly depressed or unresponsive. In patients with stable vital signs, the percentage of dehydration should be used to calculate the fluid rate and quantity required to correct hydration status BOX 1.

To decrease serum potassium concentration, a combination of regular insulin and dextrose can be administered. Insulin drives potassium into the intracellular space, and dextrose helps prevent hypoglycemia that may result from insulin administration.

The dose is 0. Urethral catheterization is the method most commonly used to remove a urethral obstruction. Cystocentesis should be performed with caution because the bladder wall is friable and prone to tearing. Performing cystocentesis.

A caudal epidural BOX 3 can facilitate the deobstruction, help decrease the amount of inhalation anesthesia required, and provide analgesia during the recovery period. Various medications can be used for the epidural injection. Administration of a sedative before the collection procedure may be required in fractious patients or patients with severe pain. Detailed information on the catheterization procedure as well as sedation is provided in BOX 4.

When vital signs are stable, urethral catheterization should be performed with the patient under sedation or general anesthesia. Sedation is indicated in patients that are not stable enough for anesthesia. Moribund patients can be catheterized without any sedation.